Events

KING LEAR

16-19 June 7:30 – 10:00 pm

In collaboration with Repertory Theater of Iowa, Salisbury House Foundation presents King Lear, Shakespeare’s greatest tragedy, a wrenching story of endurance, love, loss and reconciliation. For four summer evenings, the play is performed atop the English gardens and staged with the majestic backdrop of Salisbury House.

AS YOU LIKE IT

14-23 July 8:00 – 10:00 pm

Brucemore, Cedar Rapids

Performances of As You Like It presented by The Classics at Brucemore at the Peggy Boyle Whitworth Amphitheater near the Pond.

The Classics at Brucemore began as collaboration between Torchlight Theatrics and Brucemore in 1996, thus launching outdoor theatre in Eastern Iowa. The Classics celebrates a rich history of quality live theatre, from Greek tragedy to Shakespearean comedy and 20th century American drama. Much more than a play performed outdoors, The Classics fully utilizes the site as the natural amphitheater provides a lush backdrop and the outdoor environment is incorporated into the action — actors emerge from the woods, get dunked in the pond, and help themselves to the audience’s picnics.

B.Y.O. BOOK — A Brave New World

A series presented by the Iowa City Public Library

2 August 6:00-8:00 pm

The Mill Restaurant

Join us for the Summer/Fall 2016 series of the B.Y.O. Book “Books In Bars” Book Club meetups! By featuring books about Shakespeare’s work and books that have Shakespearean themes, we will be celebrating SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA — the exhibition of Shakespeare’s First Folio at the University of Iowa Main Library Gallery, August 29-September 25.

In August, we will be at The Mill to discuss Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World.” A limited number of books will be available at the Info Desk on the 2nd floor of the Iowa City Public Library for checkout. You must register to attend this event.

After you’ve registered, please CLICK HERE to say you are going and invite your friends.

The Prince of Wits: A Look at Iconic Scenes from Hamlet and Don Quixote

A Grinnell College Exhibit

12 August – 23 December

Grinnell College Burling Library

1111 6th Avenue, Grinnell, IA 50112

This exhibition will display iconic scenes from Hamlet and Don Quixote in a range of editions of each work held by Grinnell College’s Special Collections.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

1993 film with Kenneth Branagh

18 August 7:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Join us at the Iowa City Public Library for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. A brief introduction will be given before a screening of the film Much Ado About Nothing, 110 minutes in length.

Director Kenneth Branagh and then-wife Emma Thompson play Benedick and Beatrice, Shakespeare’s wittiest warring couple, in this exuberant version of one of his most hilarious and romantic comedies.  The all-star cast also includes some perhaps unexpected faces.

This film is one six to be offered as part of the Iowa City Public Library Shakespeare on Film Series.

A note on the series:  This series of films based on the works of Shakespeare is designed to coincide with the many events in Iowa City and at the University of Iowa celebrating the local display of a copy of the First Folio, the first published collection of many of Shakespeare’s plays.  The series features two relatively straightforward film adaptations by two of England’s major actor-directors and interpreters of Shakespeare, followed by two boldly contemporary adaptations.  In addition, two films that slyly circle around rather than directly adapt Shakespeare’s work are included, suggesting some of the range of creative ways in which modern artists have transferred Shakespeare’s theatrical works onto the screen.

SHAKESPEARE REDESIGNED

A UI Libraries exhibit

25 August – 1 December

Main Library Special Collections, 3rd Floor exhibit space

Whether they were faithful to a source text, bound it, distilled it, or plucked it apart, the creators of these books were all inspired by William Shakespeare’s writings. Drop in to view this special exhibit featuring examples of fine press and artists’ books.

HENRY V

1944 film with Laurence Olivier

25 August 7:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Join us at the Iowa City Public Library for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. A brief introduction will be given before a screening of the film Henry V, 137 minutes in length.

Laurence Oliver stars in and directs this powerful version of Shakespeare’s history play: produced in the shadow of World War II to boost British morale, Olivier’s first film as a director was given a special Academy Award for bringing this work so vividly to the screen.

This film is one six to be offered as part of the Iowa City Public Library Shakespeare on Film Series.

A note on the series:  This series of films based on the works of Shakespeare is designed to coincide with the many events in Iowa City and at the University of Iowa celebrating the local display of a copy of the First Folio, the first published collection of many of Shakespeare’s plays.  The series features two relatively straightforward film adaptations by two of England’s major actor-directors and interpreters of Shakespeare, followed by two boldly contemporary adaptations.  In addition, two films that slyly circle around rather than directly adapt Shakespeare’s work are included, suggesting some of the range of creative ways in which modern artists have transferred Shakespeare’s theatrical works onto the screen.

Shakespeare’s First Folio! GRAND OPENING

First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare

29 August 10:00 am – noon

Main Library Gallery (North Entrance of the Main Library)

Free of charge and open to the public

Please attend the SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA kick-off event celebrating the arrival of Shakespeare’s First Folio in Iowa. This rare book, printed in 1623, contains all of Shakespeare’s plays. The traveling exhibit, titled First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, on tour from the Folger Shakespeare Library, is on display in the Main Library Gallery with Shakespeare-related items from the University of Iowa Libraries’ Special Collections.

This public event will feature brief remarks, a ribbon cutting ceremony, and tours of the exhibit. Drop-ins are encouraged, no need to register in advance.

The Past, Present, and Future of Shakespeare and the First Folio

Grand Opening Lecture

29 August 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Shambaugh Auditorium, Main Library

Free of charge, all are welcome

This lecture will give a thorough overview of Shakespeares’ First Folio and its significance. UI English faculty Adam Hooks will answer questions such as, “What is the First Folio?” and “Why is it here, now?”

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead

1991 film with Tom Stoppard

1 September 7:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Join us at the Iowa City Public Library for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. A brief introduction will be given before a screening of the film Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, 118 minutes in length.

Tom Stoppard’s own film adaptation of his most famous play (first produced in 1966) centers on two of Hamlet’s minor figures, who observe most of the action of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedy from the wings.  Gary Oldman and Tim Roth may or may not play the frequently befuddled title characters.

This film is one six to be offered as part of the Iowa City Public Library Shakespeare on Film Series.

A note on the series:  This series of films based on the works of Shakespeare is designed to coincide with the many events in Iowa City and at the University of Iowa celebrating the local display of a copy of the First Folio, the first published collection of many of Shakespeare’s plays.  The series features two relatively straightforward film adaptations by two of England’s major actor-directors and interpreters of Shakespeare, followed by two boldly contemporary adaptations.  In addition, two films that slyly circle around rather than directly adapt Shakespeare’s work are included, suggesting some of the range of creative ways in which modern artists have transferred Shakespeare’s theatrical works onto the screen.

Shakespearean Stage Fighting

with Lukas Brasherfons, UI Dramaturgy student

3 September 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Lukas Brasherfons, a MFA student in Dramaturgy at UI, will present a two-hour introduction to unarmed combat for ages 13-18. 

Brasherfons will demonstrate how to safely punch, slap, fall, etc. in the most basic of ways, and tie the lessons in with how Shakespeare used violence in his plays.  

Gnomeo & Juliet

Sunday Funday at Iowa City Public Library

4 September 2:00-4:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Storytime Room

As part of the Shakespeare at Iowa celebration, the Iowa City Public Library presents Gnomeo & Juliet. Come watch an animated adaptation of his most famous play, Romeo & Juliet. Gnomeo & Juliet takes you inside the garden rivalry between Miss Capulet and Mr. Montague, which leads to the feud between their garden gnomes.

The ICPL Sunday Funday activities are for the entire family to enjoy together.

Videogame Shakespeare

7 September noon – 5:00 pm

Main Library Learning Commons, Group Area D

The Obermann Center presents Videogame Shakespeare with Gina Bloom. Play a 3D motion-capture video game as a Shakespeare avatar!

Gina Bloom and her collaborators created the Play the Knave video game to draw audiences of all ages into the world of Shakespeare’s play.

The game will be installed at the University of Iowa Library Commons during the afternoon on Wednesday, September 7.  Public participants are welcome to become avatars and play the game in person.

This event is also sponsored by the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Digital Bridges for Humanistic Inquiry: a Grinnell College/University of Iowa partnership.

 

Videogame Shakespeare: Collaboration and Creativity in Play the Knave

An Obermann Center event

7 September 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

EPB room 109

Free and open to the public

The UI Obermann Center for Advanced Studies presents guest lecturer, Gina Bloom

Gina Bloom and her collaborators created the Play the Knave video game to draw audiences of all ages into the world of Shakespeare’s play.

The game will be installed at the University of Iowa Library Commons during the afternoon and evening of Wednesday, September 7.  Public participants are welcome to become avatars and play the game in person. Professor Bloom will also give a public lecture that speaks to the general public, high and middle school teachers, and college instructors. The talk discusses opportunities for humanities scholars and teachers to integrate the humanities into STEAM initiatives, offering Play the Knave as a successful case study.

Bloom’s research ranges across Shakespeare, theater history, performance studies, and digital arts and humanities. Gina Bloom is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Davis. She is the author of Voice in Motion: Staging Gender, Shaping Sound in Early Modern England (U Penn Press, Material Texts series), which received the Best Book of the Year award in 2008 from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. She has published over a dozen articles on early modern drama, theater history, and performance studies as well as a set of essays on A Midsummer Night’s Dream for the Folger Luminary Media iPad edition of the play.

Bloom was recently elected as a Trustee to the Shakespeare Association of America and is a member of the executive committee for the Modern Language Association’s Shakespeare Forum. Current print projects include a monograph entitled “Gaming Theater:  Interactive Play before Digital Media” and a co-edited collection (with Tom Bishop and Erika Lin) on games and early modern drama. Bloom is also the Project Director for Play the Knave, a 3D motion-capture video game about Shakespeare performance that was recently featured on BBC News. Professor Bloom formerly taught in the English Department of the University of Iowa.

The Obermann Center presents this event in collaboration with the UI Libraries as part of SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA, a statewide celebration marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death.

Romeo & Juliet

a 1996 film directed by Baz Luhrmann

8 September 7:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Join us at the Iowa City Public Library for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. A brief introduction will be given before a screening of the film Romeo & Juliet, 120 minutes in length.

Baz Luhrmann’s outrageous take on Shakespeare’s famous tragedy of star-crossed teenage lovers sticks to the script while wildly updating everything else, resulting in perhaps the first major post-MTV Shakespeare adaptation.  Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes play the doomed yet immortal couple.

This film is one six to be offered as part of the Iowa City Public Library Shakespeare on Film Series.

A note on the series:  This series of films based on the works of Shakespeare is designed to coincide with the many events in Iowa City and at the University of Iowa celebrating the local display of a copy of the First Folio, the first published collection of many of Shakespeare’s plays.  The series features two relatively straightforward film adaptations by two of England’s major actor-directors and interpreters of Shakespeare, followed by two boldly contemporary adaptations.  In addition, two films that slyly circle around rather than directly adapt Shakespeare’s work are included, suggesting some of the range of creative ways in which modern artists have transferred Shakespeare’s theatrical works onto the screen.

Shakespeare’s Herbs & Flowers

10 September 9:00 – 10:00 am

Iowa City Farmers Market

The Chauncey Swan Farmers Market, 405 E. Washington Street

Free of charge and open to the public

Join us with the Iowa City Public Library at the Iowa City Farmers Market for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. Colleen E. Kennedy, PhD, visiting Assistant Professor, UI Department of English will demonstrate how locally-grown flowers and herbs were used during Shakespeare’s time.

There will be two sessions, one at 9 a.m. and one at 11 a.m.

Shakespeare’s Herbs & Flowers

10 September 11:00 am – Noon

Iowa City Farmers Market

The Chauncey Swan Farmers Market, 405 E. Washington Street

Free of charge and open to the public

Join us with the Iowa City Public Library at the Iowa City Farmers Market for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. Colleen E. Kennedy, PhD, visiting Assistant Professor, UI Department of English will demonstrate how locally-grown flowers and herbs were used during Shakespeare’s time.

There will be two sessions, one at 9 a.m. and one at 11 a.m.

Ran

a 1985 film directed by Akira Kurosawa

10 September 2:00 pm

Filmscene

In conjunction with Shakespeare at Iowa and Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition visit to Iowa City, FilmScene is pleased to present Rialto Pictures stunning restoration and rerelease of Akira Kurosawa’s Shakespearean masterpiece.

Two shows only! Don’t miss!

“Awe inspiring!” -Elliott Stein, Village Voice

“Kurosawa’s magisterial epic demands viewing on the big screen!” -Time Out New York

“Spectacular! Among the most thrilling movie experiences a viewer can have!” -Terrance Rafferty, The New York Times

Akira Kurosawa’s Academy Award-winning adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “King Lear,” RAN considers the disastrous consequences of Lord Hidetora Ichimonji’s (Tatsuya Nakadai) decision to split his kingdom among his three sons.

At the age of seventy (Kurosawa himself was 75 at the time of making this film!), Great Lord Hidetora Ichimonji, after many years of consolidating his empire, decides to abdicate his position and split his domain up between his three sons. The oldest son Taro will rule, and his second son Jiro and younger son Saburo will take over the Second and Third Castles but are expected to obey and support their older brother. The two older brothers agree with the arrangement, but Saburo objects and is banished.

Film score by Toru Takemitsu.

For tickets, visit www.icfilmscene.org

Ran

a 1985 film directed by Akira Kurosawa

11 September 2:00 pm

Filmscene

In conjunction with Shakespeare at Iowa and Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition visit to Iowa City, FilmScene is pleased to present Rialto Pictures stunning restoration and rerelease of Akira Kurosawa’s Shakespearean masterpiece.

Two shows only! Don’t miss!

“Awe inspiring!” -Elliott Stein, Village Voice

“Kurosawa’s magisterial epic demands viewing on the big screen!” -Time Out New York

“Spectacular! Among the most thrilling movie experiences a viewer can have!” -Terrance Rafferty, The New York Times

Akira Kurosawa’s Academy Award-winning adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “King Lear,” RAN considers the disastrous consequences of Lord Hidetora Ichimonji’s (Tatsuya Nakadai) decision to split his kingdom among his three sons.

At the age of seventy (Kurosawa himself was 75 at the time of making this film!), Great Lord Hidetora Ichimonji, after many years of consolidating his empire, decides to abdicate his position and split his domain up between his three sons. The oldest son Taro will rule, and his second son Jiro and younger son Saburo will take over the Second and Third Castles but are expected to obey and support their older brother. The two older brothers agree with the arrangement, but Saburo objects and is banished.

Film score by Toru Takemitsu.

For tickets, visit www.icfilmscene.org

Shakespearean Puppets and Paper Dolls

Sunday Funday at the Iowa City Public Library

11 September 2:00-4:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Storytime Room

As part of the Shakespeare at Iowa celebration, the Iowa City Public Library presents Shakespearean Puppets and Paper Dolls. Create your own set of players to perform a mini-Shakespearean performance using puppets and paper dolls. This craft is in honor of the Shakespeare First Folio exhibit. All supplies will be provided.

Sunday Funday activities are for the entire family to enjoy together.

Shakespeare & the Reformation

a free lecture by Marilynne Robinson, hosted by UCC of Iowa City

11 September 4:00 pm

Congregational Church – UCC of Iowa City

30 North Clinton Street

This year, 2016, marks the 400 year anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death.  To commemorate the year and to coincide with the University of Iowa Libraries’ hosting of the Folger Shakespeare Library national travelling exhibit of the Shakespeare First Folio, the Congregational UCC of Iowa City is hosting a lecture by award-winning author Marilynne Robinson on Shakespeare and the Reformation.  The event will be held at the UCC, 30 N. Clinton St, Iowa City on Sunday, September 11 at 4:00PM.  The lecture is free and open to the public; no reservations are necessary.

Marilynne Robinson is the author of the novels “Housekeeping”, “Gilead”, “Home”, and “Lila”, and the nonfiction works, “The Givenness of Things”, “When I Was a Child I Read Books”, “Absence of Mind”, “The Death of Adam” and “Mother Country”.

Her awards include the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2005), the Orange Prize for Fiction (2009), the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction (2005, 2014), the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction (2016), the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay (1999), and the Louisville Gravemeyer Award in Religion (2006).

Shakespeare Noon Tunes

Music in the Gallery

14 September 12:00-12:45 pm

Main Library Gallery

Free of charge, Open to the public

Drop by the Main Library Gallery at the University of Iowa at noon to hear live vocal performances of Shakespeare texts set to music. This mini-concert will feature vocalists from the Chamber Singers of Iowa City.  http://www.icchambersingers.org/

Iowa Bibliophiles with Adam Hooks

14 September 7:00 – 8:00 pm

Main Library Gallery

Free of charge and open to the public

Join Adam Hooks, Shakespeare scholar and professor of English at the UI. Hooks will give visitors a look at some books related to the exhibit that are not in the Gallery cases — an exclusive view of bonus content!

Iowa Bibliophiles is a group that meets monthly at the University of Iowa Libraries to discuss book history and book collecting, with opportunities to view and turn the pages of a variety of rare books.

So Many Instruments of Memory

Printing Sonnet 122 on the Iron Hand-Press as Public Remembrance

15 September 11:00 am – Noon

Hedges, Thomas Commons at Cornell College

Free of charge and open to the public

Attend this SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event for a talk given by Kirilka Stavreva, professor of English at Cornell College.

Stavreva will deliver an illustrated public lecture on the printing history of Shakespeare’s Sonnets, discussing the choices she made in printing Sonnet 122, Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain, on the College’s 1876 iron hand-press. The print is in response to the Bodleian Library’s worldwide call for newly hand-printed copies of the Sonnets.

O

a 2001 film with Tim Blake Nelson

15 September 7:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Join us at the Iowa City Public Library for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. A brief introduction will be given before a screening of the film O, 94 minutes in length.

Actor and director Tim Blake Nelson’s powerful update of Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello boldly relocates the story of love, loyalty, jealousy, and betrayal in a modern American high school.  Among other elements, the film features an inventive soundtrack.

This film is one six to be offered as part of the Iowa City Public Library Shakespeare on Film Series.

A note on the series:  This series of films based on the works of Shakespeare is designed to coincide with the many events in Iowa City and at the University of Iowa celebrating the local display of a copy of the First Folio, the first published collection of many of Shakespeare’s plays.  The series features two relatively straightforward film adaptations by two of England’s major actor-directors and interpreters of Shakespeare, followed by two boldly contemporary adaptations.  In addition, two films that slyly circle around rather than directly adapt Shakespeare’s work are included, suggesting some of the range of creative ways in which modern artists have transferred Shakespeare’s theatrical works onto the screen.

Chimes at Midnight

a 1965 film directed by Orson Welles

16 September 5:30 pm

Filmscene

In conjunction with Shakespeare at Iowa and Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition visit to Iowa City, FilmScene is pleased to present Orson Welles’ Shakespearean masterpiece, newly released by Janus Films.

“If I wanted to get into heaven on the basis of one movie…the one I would offer up.” -Orson Welles

“May be the greatest Shakespearean film ever made, bar none.” -Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“He [Welles] has directed a sequence, the Battle of Shrewsbury, which is unlike anything he has ever done…ranks with the best of Griffith, John Ford, Eisenstein, Kurosawa–that is, with the best ever done.” -Pauline Kael

The crowning achievement of Orson Welles’ later film career, CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT returns to the screen after being unavailable for decades. This brilliantly crafted Shakespeare adaptation was the culmination of Welles’ lifelong obsession with the Bard’s ultimate rapscallion, Sir John Falstaff, the loyal, often soused childhood friend of King Henry IV’s wayward son, Prince Hal. Appearing in several plays as a comic supporting figure, Falstaff is here the main event: a robustly funny and ultimately tragic screen antihero, played by Welles with lumbering grace. Integrating elements from both Henry IV plays as well as Richard II, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor, Welles created an unorthodox Shakespeare film that is also a gritty period piece, one that he called “a lament…for the death of Merrie England.”

Poetic, philosophical, and visceral–with a kinetic battle sequence centerpiece as impressive as anything else Welles directed–CHIMES is as monumental as the figure at its center!

For tickets, visit www.filmscene.org

Chimes at Midnight

a 1965 film directed by Orson Welles

17 September 1:00 pm

Filmscene

In conjunction with Shakespeare at Iowa and Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition visit to Iowa City, FilmScene is pleased to present Orson Welles’ Shakespearean masterpiece, newly released by Janus Films.

“If I wanted to get into heaven on the basis of one movie…the one I would offer up.” -Orson Welles

“May be the greatest Shakespearean film ever made, bar none.” -Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“He [Welles] has directed a sequence, the Battle of Shrewsbury, which is unlike anything he has ever done…ranks with the best of Griffith, John Ford, Eisenstein, Kurosawa–that is, with the best ever done.” -Pauline Kael

The crowning achievement of Orson Welles’ later film career, CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT returns to the screen after being unavailable for decades. This brilliantly crafted Shakespeare adaptation was the culmination of Welles’ lifelong obsession with the Bard’s ultimate rapscallion, Sir John Falstaff, the loyal, often soused childhood friend of King Henry IV’s wayward son, Prince Hal. Appearing in several plays as a comic supporting figure, Falstaff is here the main event: a robustly funny and ultimately tragic screen antihero, played by Welles with lumbering grace. Integrating elements from both Henry IV plays as well as Richard II, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor, Welles created an unorthodox Shakespeare film that is also a gritty period piece, one that he called “a lament…for the death of Merrie England.”

Poetic, philosophical, and visceral–with a kinetic battle sequence centerpiece as impressive as anything else Welles directed–CHIMES is as monumental as the figure at its center!

For tickets, visit www.filmscene.org

Shakespearean Family Festival

Hands-on demonstrations of book arts, acting, fencing

18 September 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Main Library, North Plaza

Rain location: Just inside the Main Library’s north entrance

Free of charge, open to the public

All are welcome to attend this event filled with activities for all ages. Come celebrate the art of book making and other Shakespearean delights, featuring a lively cast of actors, artists, scholars, book makers, and fencers. Roll up your sleeves for book art fun with paper making, book binding, and more.

In Shakespeare’s time, all books were made by hand.  But that didn’t mean book craftspeople were slow.  A team of 3 papermakers could make 2000 or more sheets in a day!  Individuals and families are encouraged to come join us, have a chance to try various aspects of bookmaking, and take home a piece of paper, a printed sheet or a bound small book that you make yourself!

Papermaking—Form your own sheet of paper from wet pulp, press it, and take it with you to dry at home. Handouts will be provided for more information about papermaking history and how to make it at home.

Printing—Print a small keepsake on a hand press similar to the presses that were used in Shakespeare’s time.  The printed impression will be a piece of Shakespeare’s writing, with a bit of background on the Bard.

Bookbinding—Bind a simple pamphlet structure, using xerox copied Shakespeare text, and a handmade paper cover. Requires basic sewing with a (dull!) darning needle.

Visitors are welcome to take part in one, two, or all three activities!

 

Chimes at Midnight

a 1965 film directed by Orson Welles

18 September 1:00 pm

Filmscene

In conjunction with Shakespeare at Iowa and Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition visit to Iowa City, FilmScene is pleased to present Orson Welles’ Shakespearean masterpiece, newly released by Janus Films.

“If I wanted to get into heaven on the basis of one movie…the one I would offer up.” -Orson Welles

“May be the greatest Shakespearean film ever made, bar none.” -Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“He [Welles] has directed a sequence, the Battle of Shrewsbury, which is unlike anything he has ever done…ranks with the best of Griffith, John Ford, Eisenstein, Kurosawa–that is, with the best ever done.” -Pauline Kael

The crowning achievement of Orson Welles’ later film career, CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT returns to the screen after being unavailable for decades. This brilliantly crafted Shakespeare adaptation was the culmination of Welles’ lifelong obsession with the Bard’s ultimate rapscallion, Sir John Falstaff, the loyal, often soused childhood friend of King Henry IV’s wayward son, Prince Hal. Appearing in several plays as a comic supporting figure, Falstaff is here the main event: a robustly funny and ultimately tragic screen antihero, played by Welles with lumbering grace. Integrating elements from both Henry IV plays as well as Richard II, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor, Welles created an unorthodox Shakespeare film that is also a gritty period piece, one that he called “a lament…for the death of Merrie England.”

Poetic, philosophical, and visceral–with a kinetic battle sequence centerpiece as impressive as anything else Welles directed–CHIMES is as monumental as the figure at its center!

For tickets, visit www.filmscene.org

Flower Crowns and Nature Masks

Sunday Funday at the Iowa City Public Library

18 September 2:00-4:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Storytime Room

As part of the Shakespeare at Iowa celebration, the Iowa City Public Library presents Flower Crowns and Nature Masks. Dress up like the characters from A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare to celebrate the First Folio exhibit. Using natural materials, create your own masquerade mask or a flower crown.

Sunday Funday activities are for the entire family to enjoy together.

Chimes at Midnight

a 1965 film directed by Orson Welles

19 September 5:30 pm

Filmscene

In conjunction with Shakespeare at Iowa and Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition visit to Iowa City, FilmScene is pleased to present Orson Welles’ Shakespearean masterpiece, newly released by Janus Films.

“If I wanted to get into heaven on the basis of one movie…the one I would offer up.” -Orson Welles

“May be the greatest Shakespearean film ever made, bar none.” -Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“He [Welles] has directed a sequence, the Battle of Shrewsbury, which is unlike anything he has ever done…ranks with the best of Griffith, John Ford, Eisenstein, Kurosawa–that is, with the best ever done.” -Pauline Kael

The crowning achievement of Orson Welles’ later film career, CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT returns to the screen after being unavailable for decades. This brilliantly crafted Shakespeare adaptation was the culmination of Welles’ lifelong obsession with the Bard’s ultimate rapscallion, Sir John Falstaff, the loyal, often soused childhood friend of King Henry IV’s wayward son, Prince Hal. Appearing in several plays as a comic supporting figure, Falstaff is here the main event: a robustly funny and ultimately tragic screen antihero, played by Welles with lumbering grace. Integrating elements from both Henry IV plays as well as Richard II, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor, Welles created an unorthodox Shakespeare film that is also a gritty period piece, one that he called “a lament…for the death of Merrie England.”

Poetic, philosophical, and visceral–with a kinetic battle sequence centerpiece as impressive as anything else Welles directed–CHIMES is as monumental as the figure at its center!

For tickets, visit www.filmscene.org

Creative Matters Lecture Series

Q Brothers, in conversation with Miriam Gilbert

20 September 5:30 – 6:30 pm

Mabie Theatre, Theatre Building

Before Hamilton: The Musical, there were The Q Brothers. The Chicago-based ensemble is world renowned for rewriting Shakespeare plays into contemporary expressions including Othello: The Remix and Funk It Up About Nothin’. This fall, they will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. Together they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

 

On September 20 at 5:30pm, the Q Brothers will be joined on stage by Miriam Gilbert, UI Emeritus Professor and Shakespeare scholar, for a Creative Matters lecture. They will discuss and demonstrate their creative process and to take questions from the audience. This event will be held in the Mabie Theatre and is free and open to the public. RSVP at http://bit.ly/2ccZHyL.

 

The Creative Matters lecture series, launched in fall 2015, seeks to demonstrate that creativity and innovation are not only at the core of all research and discovery, but also central to our human experience.  Our lineup of speakers includes artists, thinkers, builders, and doers who challenge conventional thinking about creativity, science, and artistic expression, and borrow from a range of influences and disciplines in their work. Learn more at https://creativematters.research.uiowa.edu/.

B.Y.O. Book — The Millionaire and the Bard

20 September 6:00 pm

Share Wine Lounge & Bistro

Join us for the Summer/Fall 2016 series of the B.Y.O. Book “Books In Bars” Book Club meetups! We will be celebrating the exhibition of Shakespeare’s First Folio at the University of Iowa Main Library Gallery (August 29-September 25) by featuring books about Shakespeare’s work and books that have Shakespearean themes.

This month we will be at Share Wine Lounge & Small Plate Bistro (in the Sheraton Hotel) to discuss Andrea Mays’ The Millionaire and the Bard: Henry Folger’s Obsessive Hunt for Shakespeare’s First Folio.

A limited number of books will be available at the Info Desk on the 2nd floor of the Iowa City Public Library for checkout.

Adults 21 and over; registration is required to attend.

Shakespearean Noon Tunes

Music in the Gallery

21 September 12:00 – 12:45 pm

Main Library Gallery

Free of charge, open to the public

Drop by the Main Library Gallery at the University of Iowa at noon to hear live vocal performances of Shakespeare texts set to music. This mini-concerts will feature vocal performance students from the University of Iowa’s School of Music.

Hamlet and Quixote: Still Crazy After All These Years

An Obermann Conversation

21 September 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Main Library Gallery

Free of charge, open to the public

Join Cervantes scholar Ana Rodriguez (Spanish & Portuguese, CLAS) and Shakepeare scholar Blaine Greteman (English, CLAS) for a lively conversation about the relevancy of these two authors who died 400 years ago on the same date.

This Obermann Conversation is sponsored by the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies.

Chimes at Midnight

a 1965 film directed by Orson Welles

21 September 5:30 pm

Filmscene

In conjunction with Shakespeare at Iowa and Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition visit to Iowa City, FilmScene is pleased to present Orson Welles’ Shakespearean masterpiece, newly released by Janus Films.

“If I wanted to get into heaven on the basis of one movie…the one I would offer up.” -Orson Welles

“May be the greatest Shakespearean film ever made, bar none.” -Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“He [Welles] has directed a sequence, the Battle of Shrewsbury, which is unlike anything he has ever done…ranks with the best of Griffith, John Ford, Eisenstein, Kurosawa–that is, with the best ever done.” -Pauline Kael

The crowning achievement of Orson Welles’ later film career, CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT returns to the screen after being unavailable for decades. This brilliantly crafted Shakespeare adaptation was the culmination of Welles’ lifelong obsession with the Bard’s ultimate rapscallion, Sir John Falstaff, the loyal, often soused childhood friend of King Henry IV’s wayward son, Prince Hal. Appearing in several plays as a comic supporting figure, Falstaff is here the main event: a robustly funny and ultimately tragic screen antihero, played by Welles with lumbering grace. Integrating elements from both Henry IV plays as well as Richard II, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor, Welles created an unorthodox Shakespeare film that is also a gritty period piece, one that he called “a lament…for the death of Merrie England.”

Poetic, philosophical, and visceral–with a kinetic battle sequence centerpiece as impressive as anything else Welles directed–CHIMES is as monumental as the figure at its center!

For tickets, visit www.filmscene.org

First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare

A tour hosted by the UI Alumni Association

21 September 6:00 pm

Main Library Gallery

University of Iowa Libraries will host the only stop in the state for “First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare,” a national traveling exhibition of the Shakespeare First Folio. While many of Shakespeare’s works were not published during his lifetime, the folio is the first collected edition of the author’s plays. It was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death. Two of Shakespeare’s contemporaries compiled 36 of his plays, hoping to preserve them for future generations. Without it we would not have 18 of Shakespeare’s works, including Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Antony and Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors, and As You Like It. All 18 appear for the first time in print in the First Folio.

Join us to celebrate this special occasion at the UI Main Library’s gallery, and view the exhibition of rare materials documenting Shakespeare’s extensive works.

This is a unique opportunity to experience the history of Shakespeare firsthand. Margaret Gamm, curator for the First Folio! exhibit, will give visitors a tour of the gallery that includes the original 1623 book, displayed open to Hamlet’s speech in which he debates whether “to be or not to be,” and a variety of other materials.

This event is free and open to the public; however, RSVPs are encouraged.

Looking for Richard

a 1996 film with Al Pacino

22 September 7:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Join us at the Iowa City Public Library for a SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA event. A brief introduction will be given before a screening of the film Looking for Richard, 112 minutes in length.

Al Pacino’s unique take on Shakespeare’s Richard III is a rare, revealing investigation of the actor’s art.  Seeking his own approach to one of the great, sympathetic villains in theatre history, Pacino’s behind-the-scenes documentary is as mesmerizing as his eventual stage performance in the role must have been.  Appearances by some of Shakespeare’s most famous modern interpreters are also featured in Pacino’s first, award-winning film as a director.

This film is one six to be offered as part of the Iowa City Public Library Shakespeare on Film Series.

A note on the series:  This series of films based on the works of Shakespeare is designed to coincide with the many events in Iowa City and at the University of Iowa celebrating the local display of a copy of the First Folio, the first published collection of many of Shakespeare’s plays.  The series features two relatively straightforward film adaptations by two of England’s major actor-directors and interpreters of Shakespeare, followed by two boldly contemporary adaptations.  In addition, two films that slyly circle around rather than directly adapt Shakespeare’s work are included, suggesting some of the range of creative ways in which modern artists have transferred Shakespeare’s theatrical works onto the screen.

Hawkeye Shakespeare: Teaching Shakespeare in Iowa

a weekend workshop for college-level faculty and instructors

23 -24 September

“Hawkeye Shakespeare” is a weekend workshop and an ongoing project supported by the Folger Shakespeare Library’s NEH-funded program “Teaching Shakespeare to Undergraduates.”

This initiative is intended to connect teachers and researchers across departments, disciplines, and institutions in the state of Iowa. The initial collaborative event hosted by the University of Iowa (Sept. 23-24) will feature University faculty and librarians, book artists, performance artists, and faculty from several other educational institutions.

The event will consist of a keynote pedagogical presentation, four workshop sessions guided by presenters and participants, and a collaborative work session during which course plans and materials will be created. Faculty and graduate student instructors from all educational institutions in Iowa are encouraged to participate.

For details, please visit the Hawkeye Shakespeare site. To attend, please register in advance.

Experiencing Digital Shakespeare

a keynote address for the “Hawkeye Shakespeare” workshop

23 September 5:00 -6:00 pm

Main Library, Shambaugh Auditorium

Free of charge, open to the public

The public is invited to attend this keynote address by Sarah Werner, who worked with the Folger Shakespeare Library for nearly a decade, first as Undergraduate Program Director and then as Digital Media Strategist.

In her blog, Wynken de Worde, Werner describes herself as a “book historian, library enthusiast, and digital tools explorer. I strive to connect people with special collections libraries and to connect libraries with the growing world of digital resources for exploring book history.” Werner is currently working on an open-access web site to help teachers and students explore the study of early book printing.

Dost thou speak masterly?

Iowa Reads Shakespeare

24 September 1:00 – 3:00 pm

City Park of Iowa City, Riverside Festival Stage

This is the closing event for the First Folio! celebration. Join us in City Park to read Shakespeare aloud before the Folio moves on to its next tour stop.

The idea for a public reading in the park came has its roots planted firmly in Iowa soil. A century ago, Iowa City celebrated the tercentenary of Shakespeare’s death. In 1916, the world was at war, and, as always, the arts were a healing salve. People gathered, donned Shakespearean costumes, and paraded to City Park to hear readings from the Bard’s plays.

So here we are in 2016, celebrating Shakespeare’s quatercentenary. We have planned to gather again in City Park. Interesting, isn’t it, that a public theatre-in-the-round now sits where Iowans observed Shakespeare’s last 100th birthday?

On September 24, 2016, we’ll gather at the Riverside Festival Theatre to read Shakespeare. For inspiration, we recall the words of Duke Orsino in Twelfth Night (Act II, Scene IV), “Thou dost speak masterly.”

We put it to you, follow Iowans: DOST THOU SPEAK MASTERLY? DO YOU LOVE READING SHAKESPEARE? Demonstrate your acting prowess at the closing event of First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare, on tour from the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Here’s how you can participate:

  1. No matter where you live, you can participate by CASTING YOUR VOTE for your favorite Shakespeare play.
  2. PERFORMING A SCENE from the most popular Shakespeare play in Iowa will be featured along with other live readings of Shakespeare by professionals, community members, and you! Gather your troupe, choose your scene from Shakespeare’s plays, and register to read your lines on the Riverside Festival Stage at City Park in Iowa City.
  3. The event will also include a costume contest.

William & Blackjack Storytelling

Sunday Funday at the Iowa City Public Library

25 September 2:00-4:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Storytime Room

As part of the Shakespeare at Iowa celebration, the Iowa City Public Library presents William & Blackjack Storytelling. Come listen to Renaissance lore as told by William and BlackJack. This is an entertaining, participatory storytelling experience for all. William uses many different props including: Midnight, his juggling sticks, dragons’ tears, magical pirate treasure, and, of course, Blackjack the Dragon. He will be in the Children’s Room before and after his storytelling performance.

Sunday Funday activities are for the entire family to enjoy together.

Main Library Gallery is closed

First Folio is leaving Iowa

26 – 27 September

Main Library Gallery

The Main Library Gallery will be closed September 26 and 27 while we prepare the space for the remaining weeks of our Shakespeare at Iowa celebration.

During this time, we will bid a fond farewell to Shakespeare’s First Folio, as it departs for its next destination on the national tour.

To learn more about the tour’s remaining stops this year, visit the Folger Shakespeare Library site.

Hamlet’s Dreams – the Robben Island Shakespeare

a Shakespeare book discussion

27 September 7:00 – 8:00 pm

Iowa City Public Library, Meeting Room A

Free of charge, open to the public

Hamlet’s Dreams brings together the Robben Island Prison of Nelson Mandela and the prison that is Denmark for Shakespeare’s Hamlet. David Shalkwyk uses the circulation of the so-called ‘Robben Island Shakespeare,’ a copy of the Alexander edition of the Complete Works that was secretly circulated, annotated and signed by a group of Robben Island political prisoner in the 1970s (including Nelson Mandela), to examine the representation and experience of imprisonment in South African prison memoirs and Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

The discussion will be led by Colleen E. Kennedy, PhD, visiting assistant professor of English at the UI. A limited number of copies are available at the Info Desk on the Second Floor of the Iowa City Public Library.

Shakespearean Noon Tunes

Music in the Main Library Gallery

28 September 12:00 – 12:45 pm

Main Library Gallery

Free of charge, open to the public

Drop by the Main Library Gallery at the University of Iowa at noon to hear live vocal performances of Shakespeare texts set to music. This mini-concerts will feature vocal performance students from the University of Iowa’s School of Music.

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

29 September 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

30 September 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

1 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

2 October 2:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)

To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

5 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)

To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

6 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)

To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

7 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Iowa City Book Festival

Presented by the Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature

8 October 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Locations in and around downtown Iowa City

Free of charge, open to the public

The 2016 Iowa City Book Festival will feature a handful of events dedicated to Shakespeare, with panel discussions that will find festival authors from around the world discussing the Bard’s influence, and presentations by authors about their own scholarship related to Shakespeare’s work.

The Iowa City Book Festival is a four-day celebration of books, reading, and writing. Presented by the Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature, the festival includes readings, discussions, and demonstrations from a variety of authors. Most events will be held on Saturday, Oct. 8. For specific times and locations for festival events, or to learn more about programs and authors, please visit www.iowacitybookfestival.org

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

8 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

9 October 2:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Iowa Bibliophiles with Emily Martin, “Finding My Way to Shakespeare”

12 October 6:30 – 8:00 pm

Main Library, 3rd Floor Special Collections Reading Room

Free of charge, open to the public

Artist Emily Martin will speak on her recent work using Shakespeare’s tragedies as her source material.

Romeo & Juliet at the Englert

Branagh Theatre Live HD Rebroadcast

12 October, 7:00 pm

The Englert Theatre

221 East Washington Street, Iowa City, IA

“The production certainly has a pulsating energy” – The Guardian
“This is quite simply the best Romeo and Juliet for some time.” – City A.M.

The Kenneth Branagh Theatre Company Live cinema season continues with a new vision of Shakespeare’s heartbreaking tale of forbidden love. Branagh and his creative team present a modern passionate version of the classic tragedy.

A longstanding feud between Verona’s Montague and Capulet families brings about devastating consequences for two young lovers caught in the conflict.

Kenneth Branagh co-directs with Rob Ashford, reuniting with the stars of his celebrated film of Cinderella, Richard Madden (Game of Thrones) and Lily James (Downton Abbey), as Romeo and Juliet. Also featuring Sir Derek Jacobi as Mercutio and Meera Syal as The Nurse.

Romeo and Juliet will be screened in black and white.

Ticketing: $18 Adult General Admission
$15 Student and Senior General Admission

Purchase tickets at the Box Office or Online

The Englert Theatre presents this event as part of the University of Iowa Libraries’ SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA, a statewide celebration marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death.

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

13 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

14 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

Rome Sweet Rome

Q Brothers Iowa Partnership in the Arts

15 October 8:00 pm

David Thayer Theatre

Open to the public; please see below for ticket information

The Q Brothers (JQ, GQ, Jax, and Pos) are internationally known for their previous add-rap-tations: The Bomb-itty of Errors, Funk It Up About Nothin’, Othello The Remix, and Q Brothers’ Christmas Carol. This fall, The Q’s are excited bring their unique brand of adaptation to another age-old text. Over the course of five weeks, The Q’s will work with students from the University of Iowa to devise, revise, and remix Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into a modern hip-hop musical. In this yet to be titled Julius Caesar Project, they will explore the themes of fate, betrayal, and political corruption.

TICKETS: $20 Adults; $14 Seniors (65+); $10 Students and Youth; $5 UI Students (with valid ID)To order tickets, please visit www.hancher.uiowa.edu/tickets

B.Y.O. Book — Station Eleven

A series presented by the Iowa City Public Library

18 October 6:00 – 7:00 pm

Northside Bistro

Free of charge, open to adults

Join us for the Summer/Fall 2016 series of the B.Y.O.Book “Books In Bars” Book Club meetups! By featuring books about Shakespeare’s work and books that have Shakespearean themes, we will be celebrating SHAKESPEARE AT IOWA — the exhibition of Shakespeare’s First Folio at the University of Iowa Main Library Gallery, August 29-September 25.

In October, we will be at the Northside Bistro to discuss Emily St. John Mandel’s “Station Eleven: a Novel.”  A limited number of books will be available at the Info Desk on the 2nd floor of the Iowa City Public Library for checkout. You must register to attend this event.

Creepy Campus Crawl Shakespeare Style

a Shakespeare-themed family event

28 October

Old Capitol

Free of charge, open to the public

Join us for a family event for kids ages 2-10.

TEACHING SHAKESPEARE IN IOWA

A workshop for teachers of grades 6-12

29 October and 5 November

Teacher Leader Center, 110 Lindquist Center North

UI College of Education

A two-day license-renewal course for teachers of grades 6-12, taught by Adam Hooks, Shakespeare scholar and associate professor of English at the UI. Please register in advance. For further information, please email adam-hooks@uiowa.edu

Iowa Bibliophiles with Blaine Greteman: “Shakeosphere: Visualizing Shakespeare’s Networks”

a lecture by Blaine Greteman

9 November 6:30 – 8:00 pm

Main Library, 3rd Floor Special Collections Reading Room

Free of charge, open to the public

Join Blaine Greteman, UI associate professor of English for a talk about Visualizing Shakespeare’s Networks.

Family Weekend at the UI School of Music

11 November

Voxman Music Building, 93 East Burlington Street, Iowa City

Free of charge, open to the public

The UI Center for Performing Arts will host Family Weekend, offering a variety of performances, including music and dance from the period and a performance of the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet.